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New! 2018 Romantic Blue Danube: Budapest to Prague

Hungary: Budapest • Slovakia: Bratislava • Austria: Vienna, Krems • Czech Republic: Cesky Krumlov, Prague

ABOARD OUR PRIVATELY OWNED 140- TO 162-PASSENGER SHIPS DESIGNED FOR AMERICAN TRAVELERS
89% Traveler Excellence Rating Read reviews

15 Days from only $3695 including international airfare

Activity Level:

1 2 3 4 5

Easy

Trip Experience

Watch travelers explore Budapest, Bratislava, and Prague on walking tours of each city.

Trip Itinerary

Get more information about your detailed itinerary, like optional tours and exclusive Discovery Series events.

Trip Extension: Poland

See travelers exploring Krakow and Warsaw, including a visit to Auschwitz, on their optional extension.

Trip Extension: Budapest

Let restaurant owners and a musician introduce you to Budapest, Hungary, on our optional trip extension.

Program Director

Find out why Istvan Pinter thinks the Hospital in the Rock and Market Hall are must-sees when in Budapest.

Program Director

Get an inside look into Program Director Tereza Libichova's life outside of guiding.

Courtesy Small World Productions
Prague and Budapest

Join travel expert Rudy Maxa to discover the Old World splendor on display in Prague and Budapest.

Courtesy BBC.com Travel
The Heart of Prague Pumps Lager

Toast to pilsner, and learn about the famous pale lager that has satisfied Czech beer fans since 1842.

Courtesy Andras Deak
Budapest, Belvárosi, Nagyboldogasszony, Plébánia

Embark on a bird's-eye-view tour of the commanding "Queen of the Danube," in this incredible drone-shot film.

Courtesy Regina Fraser, Pat Johnson and Kathy Monk
Poland – Warsaw and Krakow: Sophisticated Sister Cities

Join the Grannies on Safari for a preview of the cultural delights on display during our trip extension to Poland.

©2014 The New York Times
36 Hours in Vienna

Discover the modern food scene, imperial heritage, and artisanal offerings that await in Vienna.

Courtesy CNN
Berlin's hidden charm

From concert halls to currywurst stands—Berlin’s locals show you their favorite side of the city.

Courtesy CNN
The Best Puppet Show in Prague

Local artists show off their favorite spots in Prague—from a marionette workshop to a pub.

Courtesy CNN
Europe's Creative Hub

See how Berlin’s modern scene thrives alongside its ever-present history through the eyes of creative locals.

FROM
$3695
15 DAYS
$247/DAY
including international airfare
14 DAYS FROM $2895 River Cruise Tour Only
Extend Your Trip
 

Save $250 per person
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ATTENTION
This trip features long flights and/or multiple connections

 

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NEW: Activity Level

Our NEW Activity Level rating system ranks our trips on a scale of 1 (easiest) to 5 (most difficult) to help you determine if a trip is right for you. The information below is a general guide to our rating system, but see our itineraries for much more detailed physical activity information about each trip.

Activity Level 1:

1 2 3 4 5

Easy

Travelers should be able to climb 25 stairs consecutively, plus walk at least 1-2 miles over some uneven surfaces without difficulty. Walks typically last at least 1-2 hours at a time. Altitude can range from zero to 5,000 feet.

Activity Level 2:

1 2 3 4 5

Moderately Easy

Travelers should be able to climb 40 stairs consecutively, plus walk at least 2-3 miles over some uneven surfaces without difficulty. Walks typically last for at least 2-3 hours at a time. Altitude can range from zero to 5,000 feet.

Activity Level 3:

1 2 3 4 5

Moderate

Travelers should be able to climb 60 stairs consecutively, plus walk at least 3 miles over some steep slopes and loose or uneven surfaces without difficulty. Walks typically last for 3 or more hours at a time. Altitude can range from 5,000 to 7,000 feet.

Activity Level 4:

1 2 3 4 5

Moderately Strenuous

Travelers should be able to climb 80 stairs consecutively, plus walk at least 4 miles over some steep slopes and loose or uneven surfaces without difficulty. Walks typically last for 4 or more hours at a time. Altitude can range from 7,000 to 9,000 feet.

Activity Level 5:

1 2 3 4 5

Strenuous

Travelers should be able to climb 100 or more stairs consecutively, plus walk at least 8 miles over some steep slopes and loose or uneven surfaces without difficulty. Walks typically last for 4 or more hours at a time. Altitude can range from 10,000 feet or more.

Post-trip: Berlin & Dresden, Germany

5 nights from: $895 Single Supplement: FREE

Discover two of Germany’s best-loved cities: Dresden, a city risen from the ashes of World War II to reclaim its place as an intellectual and cultural center, and Berlin, the imperial capital turned epicenter of the Third Reich whose eventual liberation affected us all.

It's Included:
Accommodations for 3 nights in Berlin and 2 nights in Dresden
6 meals: Daily breakfasts and 1 lunch
Included tours: Berlin • Wittenberg • Dresden • Pima
Dedicated services of a local Program Director
Gratuities for local guides and motorcoach drivers
All transfers
  • After breakfast at your hotel in Prague, you'll travel overland to Pirna, Germany—stopping for lunch in Litomerice, Czech Republic. You'll also pass the impregnable hilltop Konigstein Fortress, a former royal redoubt and one of the handful of castles in Europe to never fall in battle.

    Then, continue on to Dresden. Once you've checked into your hotel, your Program Director will lead you on a short tour of the vicinity to help you familiarize yourself with the city. Your Program Director will point out nearby restaurants where you can savor dinner on your own tonight.

  • Rise early this morning and enjoy a full breakfast. Then you're off to tour the city of Dresden by motorcoach. Situated in a broad floodplain, Dresden was founded in the twelfth century by Slavs; only in the early 1300s was Dresden given to the Germanic Wettin dynasty. By the late 1400s, Dresden was the seat of Saxon dukes, and a century later, the city was home to the prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire. It was one of these prince-electors, Augustus I, who first called the finest painters, architects, and musicians from across Europe to Dresden in the late 1500s. From that time onward, Dresden gained a reputation as an open, tolerant city of artists. The city was captured by Napoleon during his march across Europe and played a significant role in the continent-wide social revolutions of 1848, but even during its time as the capital of Saxony, Dresden was never heavily garrisoned. The city experienced exponential growth in the 19th century, seeing its population quadruple as a result of the Industrial Revolution. Many of these new residents were, again, artists from across Europe. These artists helped make Dresden a hub of modern art until 1933.

    With the rise of the Nazis in Germany, artists and intellectuals began fleeing the newly proclaimed Reich. Still, Dresden retained its status as an artistic capital and was largely defenseless when war broke out in 1939. Its location far from the front lines and the lack of heavy industry in the Dresden metropolitan area seemed to augur that Dresden would escape the worst wounds of the war. As the tide of the war turned inexorably against Hitler, hundreds of thousands of refugees streamed into Dresden; having escaped Allied bombing, Dresden was perceived as a safe zone. February 13, 1945 marked the beginning of one of the most controversial events in World War II: 1,300 Allied aircraft used incendiary bombs to burn Dresden to the ground. The city was utterly and completely destroyed, and thousands of civilians were killed. Kurt Vonnegut, himself a survivor of the air raids, chronicled these events in Slaughterhouse-Five.

    Following the war, Dresden was rebuilt from the ground up. Today, the Frauenkirche, a church whose ruins stood as a stark reminder of the war, has been totally reconstructed, incorporating the charred bricks of the original structure as a tribute to the past. Dresden stands as an eternal reminder of the folly of war and the indomitability of the human creative spirit.

    Explore Dresden on your own this afternoon and evening, perhaps enjoying Saxon cuisine on your own for lunch and dinner.

  • After breakfast today, we depart for Berlin via Wittenberg, where you’ll enjoy a short orientation walk with your Program Director. Then, enjoy free time in the former home of Martin Luther and the birthplace of the Protestant Reformation. Enjoy lunch on your own here and perhaps visit some of the town's splendid churches before we continue on our way. A short two-hour drive through scenic forests and farmlands brings you to Berlin in the early evening. Your Program Director will lead you on a short vicinity walk after checking you into your hotel. Dinner is on your own tonight.

  • This morning, enjoy an included tour of Berlin. The second-largest urban area in Europe, Berlin is an enormous city, but most of its most iconic sites are relatively close together. Divided at the end of World War II, blockaded by the Soviets during the Cold War, riven by a cruel grey wall, and finally delivered by the sledgehammers of freedom fighters, Berlin is once again a united city. The city's lakes and forests provide bucolic retreats in an urban setting, while its divided history has led to a truly unique collection of architectural styles. If you find yourself in the old Soviet sector of the city, keep your eyes open for extant Ampelmannchen, the “little traffic light man” who adorned East German traffic lights. The Reichstag, site of the final defense of the Third Reich, was rebuilt after World War II and now features an enormous glass dome, emphasizing the transparency and openness of the new Germany. Like so much of Berlin, the future and past are inextricably mixed. Later on today, use your new-found knowledge of Berlin to explore the city at your leisure. 

    Or, join an optional tour of nearby Potsdam. The residence of the Prussian kings until 1918, Potsdam is home to the Sanssouci, the former summer palace of Frederick the Great and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Even larger than the Sanssouci is the New Palace, built to celebrate the Prussian triumph over Austrian domination in the Seven Years' War. Potsdam played an important role in shaping the post-war world. Stalin, Truman, and Churchill met here to determine how to deal with a defeated Germany, and the city's Glienicke Bridge became known as the “Bridge of Spies” during the Cold War, as the superpowers used its midpoint as a place to exchange captured agents. After dinner at a local restaurant, return to Berlin.

  • Explore Berlin at your own pace today.

    Perhaps you’ll explore Museum Island, a UNESCO World Heritage Site conveniently located near the city center. Or maybe you’d like to explore Schloss Charlottenburg, the largest remaining palace in the city. Lunch and dinner are on your own today.

    • Meals included:

    After an early breakfast, transfer to the airport for your flight home.

Please note: Dresden & Berlin is a post-trip extension on the Budapest to Prague itinerary and a pre-trip extension on the Prague to Budapest itinerary. This extension may not be available for all departures. Additional taxes and fees will apply. Ask our Travel Counselors for details. Call 1-800-221-2610.

Click below to read our Travel Planning Guide on Romantic Blue Danube: Budapest to Prague

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