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Day by Day Itinerary

Join us on our NEW Grand Baltic Sea Voyage Small Ship Cruise Tour, and set sail on a voyage along the coast of the briny Baltic Sea, from Denmark to Poland … from the Baltic states of Latvia and Estonia to Mother Russia … and back again to the Nordic lands of Finland and Sweden. Aboard our 98-passenger, all-suite Corinthian, you’ll first explore the countries of Scandinavia, a region filled with ice-capped waters, wind-blown beaches, bucolic farmlands, and acre upon acre of lush, verdant forestry. Depart Copenhagen—gateway to the Baltic Sea and beyond—and discover a land of breathtaking natural beauty peppered with stunning medieval cities. The population is small in this part of Europe, but places such as Rønne, Visby, Stockholm, and Helsinki blend harmoniously with the mountains, lakes, waterfalls, and woodlands that dominate much of the landscape. You’ll also get a taste of Polish life in the port cities of Gdynia and Gdańsk before making your way to Riga and Tallinn, two cities populated with turrets, spires, and cobbled streets. After decades of Soviet occupation—and a bloodless revolution filled with national songs and patriotic hymns—the Baltic states have reemerged as independent countries with open arms for visitors. Then glide to St. Petersburg for an in-depth tour of this glorious city, founded by Peter the Great in the early 18th century as a showcase for Russia’s imperial might. You can also enhance your experience with our optional extensions to Copenhagen, Denmark and Stockholm, Sweden.

Copenhagen Stockholm Reverse Direction Expand All
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    Depart the U.S. today on your flight to Copenhagen, Denmark. Please refer to your personal air itinerary for exact departure and arrival times.

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    Arriving in Denmark, you’ll be met at the airport by a Grand Circle representative and assisted to your hotel. Grow acquainted with the area around your hotel with an orientation walk before an afternoon free to explore Copenhagen independently, with lunch and dinner on your own.

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    After breakfast this morning, take in the sights of Copenhagen during a panoramic tour, giving you a glimpse of the city’s colorful houses, picturesque canals, charming pedestrian squares, and innovative modern architectural designs. Enjoy lunch on your own before transferring to the pier to embark the Corinthian.

    During your cruise, you’ll receive a “port talk” about the pier area and town prior to arrival, so you can make the best use of your free time. This evening, you’ll gather for your first port talk. Then get better acquainted with your ship’s Captain and crew during a Welcome Dinner. As they say in Scandinavia, “Smaklig måltid!” (“Enjoy your meal!”)

    Tonight, set sail for your first destination: Rønne, Denmark.

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    After breakfast onboard, explore Rønne during a guided city tour. Located on the island of Bornholm (considered the “pearl of the Baltic Sea” because of its breathtaking scenery), Rønne is a town of cobbled streets, half-timbered houses, and brightly-painted buildings. During your tour, you’ll visit Store Torv (the town’s largest square, where the Danes sell produce, clothing, and granite jewelry during market days), Bornholms Teater (Denmark’s oldest theater), and the octagonal Rønne lighthouse (built in 1880 and operational until it was decommissioned in 1989).

    After your guided tour of the town’s center, you’ll make your way to Hjorths Fabrik—a ceramic museum showcasing the long history of pottery-making in Rønne—for an exclusive Discovery Series event. Bornholm residents have been digging into the island’s rich deposits of clay and creating unusual and whimsical pots, plates, and cups since the early 18th century. The Hjorth ceramic factory opened in 1858 and was operational for more than a century, before it shut down in 1993. Today, the museum (still run by the Hjorth family) houses ceramic artifacts from the early 18th century, pieces made when the factory was operational, and works done by modern-day Bornholm potters.

    Return to the ship for lunch onboard. The rest of the afternoon is yours to continue your discoveries. Perhaps you’ll choose to visit one of the town’s many clockmakers, a tradition dating back to 1744. The island was once known for its unique grandfather clocks until the craft disappeared after World War II. In recent years, the tradition has revived and the clocks’ hourly chimes can be heard singing throughout the streets.

    This evening, enjoy dinner onboard as your ship cruises to the next port of call.

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    • Meals included:
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    After breakfast this morning, you’ll dock in Gdansk and then transfer to Gdynia for an included tour of an amber factory, an exclusive Discovery Series event. The Baltic region is home to the world’s largest deposit of amber, known specifically as “Baltic amber” (or colloquially as “Polish gold” in Poland). The amber—or fossilized tree resin—is 44 million years old around the Baltic Sea and is mined to make such things as jewelry, table lamps, and even furniture. The more valuable pieces have been known to contain species of now-extinct insects or plants.

    After, you’ll share a Home-Hosted Lunch with a local family before transferring back to Gdansk for a guided tour of the Stare Miasto (Old Town). Gdansk is a Polish city with a Baltic vibe—a maritime city that’s been around for a millennium and has fluctuated between great prosperity and tragic destruction. While Gdańsk still shows its scars from the tumult of World War II, this unique city offers a wealth of architectural beauty and a myriad of activities. Wander past the town hall, where stands the Neptune Fountain, rumored to have once spouted Gdansk’s trademark liqueur, Goldwasser, instead of water. You’ll also marvel at the city’s many gates—including the Green Gate, the Golden Gate, and the Upland Gate—and the Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers, three 138-foot-tall steel crosses at the entrance to the city’s shipyard. A sudden spike in food costs in 1970 led to mass riots throughout northern Poland that left at least 40 dead and more than 1,000 wounded. The monument is the first to commemorate the victims of a communist regime.

    At the conclusion of your tour, you’ll have time to further explore the city’s Old Town. Perhaps you’ll discover one of Gdansk’s many cafés, bookstores, or shops (where you can admire examples of northern Poland’s famed amber jewelry).

    Later, you’ll make your way to Katedra Oliwska, the Oliwa cathedral, for an organ concerto. The cathedral is the longest church in Poland and houses two organs—a smaller choir organ, and the famed “great organ”—one of the largest in the world.

    This evening, enjoy dinner onboard as your ship sails toward Visby, Sweden.

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    • Meals included:
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    On Gotland Island, the city of Visby has existed for more than a thousand years, with its signature ringmur (“ringwall”) encircling the town since the 13th century. Reachable only by boat or plane, and beloved as a holiday destination for Swedes, the “city of ruins and roses” is rich with historical artifacts, earning it a designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Enjoy an included panoramic tour of Visby as its history unfolds before you, its hundreds of warehouses and merchant homes telling the story of its heyday as a major port between Russia and Western Europe for the Hanseatic League.

    Return to the Corinthian for an included lunch, then go ashore in Visby once more to make discoveries on your own, or stroll with your Program Director on a leisurely walk along the cobblestone streets.

    Enjoy dinner onboard as we cruise toward Riga, Latvia.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    Set close to the mouth of the Daugava River, which travels from the Baltic Sea into Russia, Riga was historically an important trade port. Its prosperity also made it a target for conquest. Before Latvia declared itself an independent nation in 1918, Riga was claimed by Russia, Sweden, Lithuania, and Germany. As a diverse, thriving city with a prominent upper class, Riga experienced radical change under occupation by the Soviets and Nazis. Buildings from Riga’s most prosperous eras—particularly the Art Nouveau period—still stand throughout the city, as you’ll discover on a city tour by motorcoach and on foot. You’ll enjoy special focus on the Art Nouveau era as you explore a district rich with facades from the early 20th-century period in which architecture became romantic, favoring natural and mythological embellishments.

    After lunch onboard, you may enjoy time ashore in Riga. Perhaps you’ll visit Riga’s Old Town, a dizzying collection of cobbled lanes, gargoyle-adorned buildings, and lovingly restored 17th-century architectural treasures under UNESCO World Heritage Site protection. You’ll also have a chance to explore the city’s Central Market—the largest market in Europe—during an exclusive Discovery Series event. Located in converted German Zeppelin hangars from the 1930s, the market's pavilions encompass more than three-quarters of a million square feet of space and are also under UNESCO protection.

    Dinner is aboard ship this evening.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    Join us this morning for our optional Rundale Palace tour. A masterpiece of Baroque and Rococo style, 18th-century Rundale Palace was built on the orders of Ernst Johann Biron, the Duke of Courtland, and the Russian Empress he loved, Anna Ioannovna. The palace boasts opulent chambers, as well as extensive French gardens. You’ll tour the palace and the rose garden, before enjoying lunch at a local restaurant.

    Or, explore the city at your own pace. Perhaps you’ll pay a visit to the Nordic wooden dwellings of Kipsala Island, or build upon yesterday’s discoveries with a visit to the recently opened Riga Art Nouveau Museum, located in the former apartment of Latvian architect Konstantins Pekšens. Return to the ship for lunch.

    This evening, learn more about the evolution of the independence movement in the Baltic states during a Singing Revolution discussion, an exclusive Discovery Series event. Dinner is onboard the ship as you cruise toward Tallinn, Estonia.

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    Your ship arrives in Tallinn, Estonia this morning. A wonderfully preserved city of the old Hanseatic League, this ancient walled port on the Baltic is a UNESCO World Heritage Site filled with remarkable fortresses, castles, and cathedrals. Medieval Tallinn had six gates, all bastion-forts complete with moats and drawbridges.

    You'll gain insight into Estonia's premier city during this morning's guided tour. Tallinn’s Old Town is still encircled by city walls, punctuated with many stone towers rising above red-tiled roofs. Within the city walls, the streets remain much as they were when Danish rulers built them in the 13th century. This historic city center is divided into the Lower Town and the Upper Town. In the Lower Town, the 600-year-old Town Hall—the best-preserved of its kind in northern Europe—has a tower that presides dramatically over Town Hall Square (Raejoka plats). The Upper Town is on Toompea Hill, where two landmarks that originated in the 13th century still stand: Toompea Castle (now the meeting place for the Estonian Parliament) and the Dome Church (Estonia’s largest Lutheran sanctuary). Many of the city’s historic buildings reflect the prosperity it enjoyed between the 14th and 16th centuries. Under German control, Tallinn flourished during these years as a trade port in the Hanseatic League. Later periods of Swedish and Russian rule also left their marks on Tallinn, whose rich layers of history you’ll delve into during your tour.

    After lunch aboard the Corinthian, you can set out independently to explore more of the city at your own pace. You may want to visit Kiek-in-de-Kok (Look-into-the-Kitchen), a bastion built in 1470. At the time, it was the tallest building in Estonia and earned its name because it was said that watchmen could peer into the kitchens of the houses below. Or you might take a walk in Town Hall Square. Originally called Market Square, excavations show that it was a market as long as a thousand years ago. Here the 14th-century Town Hall has been preserved almost intact in its original Gothic form, and still serves as the City Hall.

    This evening, join your traveling companions for an included dinner aboard ship as you cruise toward St. Petersburg, Russia.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    St. Petersburg, founded as the new capital of the Russian Empire more than 300 years ago, was the vision and creation of Tsar Peter I, who named it after his patron saint, Peter. This beautiful showcase of a city, covering 150 square miles, is a synthesis of both European and Russian styles, with elements of both East and West. Pushkin called this city “Peter the Great’s Window to the West.” St. Petersburg has more than 40 picturesque islands, more than 60 canals, and hundreds of lovely bridges, and it is considered one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

    After breakfast, enjoy a panoramic tour of St. Petersburg, including a visit to St. Isaac’s Cathedral. This is the largest church in the city, built originally to be the main church of the Russian Empire. The dome of the cathedral, which dominates the city’s skyline, is gilded with more than 200 pounds of gold, and the interior is elaborately decorated with exquisite mosaics, icons, malachite, and lapis lazuli. This grand church can seat 14,000 worshippers. Although the church was closed after the 1917 Revolution, it reopened as a museum in 1931, and services for worshippers were again introduced in 1990.

    This afternoon, after a light lunch at a local restaurant, you’ll continue exploring St. Petersburg, with an included visit to the Hermitage Museum. Formerly the Winter Palace and home of the tsars, today this is one of the most splendid museums in the world. Built by the Empress Elizabeth, daughter of Peter I, the palace became part of the Hermitage, originated in 1764 when Catherine the Great began her private art collection. Today, more than 1,000 rooms house nearly three million exhibits and displays representing some of the world’s greatest art.

    The staggering collection of art and paintings ranges from ancient Egypt to early 20th-century Europe, and is set in a complex of buildings magnificently and lavishly adorned with gold leaf, malachite, jasper, agate, and marble. Marvel at masterpieces by da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, a full range of French Impressionists, Van Gogh, Rodin, and many more of the world’s great artists. After your visit to the Hermitage, return to your ship in the afternoon.

    Tonight, enjoy dinner onboard your ship. You might elect to join our optional excursion to a folk show at Nikolayevsky Palace, enjoying live music, dancing, and games in a 19th-century setting.

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    This morning, enjoy an included excursion to the magnificent summer residence of the Russian royalty at Peterhof, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1714, Peter the Great asked for a “Versailles by the Sea.” The site evolved into a grand palace atop the hill surrounded by a park. Visit Catherine’s Wing, a small palace on the grounds, and see the palace’s remarkable Grand Cascade, an extraordinary fountain ensemble made up of three waterfalls, nearly 150 fountains shooting more than 2,000 jets of water, and a myriad of statues and sculptures.

    After lunch aboard ship, you may return to discover the city as you wish—browse some shops, visit monuments, and learn more about Russia's rich culture, or sip coffee at a café and watch the life of St. Petersburg unfold around you.

    Enjoy dinner onboard this evening.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    This morning, we drop anchor in Helsinki, Finland’s capital city. After breakfast onboard, enjoy a tour of Helsinki with a local guide. During your half-day tour of the city, known as “the Daughter of the Baltic,” you’ll visit the Sibelius Monument, a collection of 600 steel pipes arranged into a wave-like sculpture as a tribute to the composer, as well as the Temppeliaukio Kirkko, a church beautifully hewn out of solid granite. Your tour showcases Market Square, a perennial outdoor market, and Senate Square, undoubtedly the pride of the city. Senate Square is ringed by a treasury of Empire Neoclassic buildings, including the 19th-century Lutheran Cathedral, whose central tower dominates the skyline. As you wend your way through Helsinki, notice how the sea is such an integral part of they city. Helsinki is built over peninsulas, curving around bays and spilling out across islands that are linked by bridges, causeways, and boats of all descriptions.

    After lunch onboard, enjoy time to explore Helsinki on your own.

    This evening, as we set sail for Stockholm, Sweden, enjoy a Captain’s Farewell Drink and Farewell Dinner.

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    Bid farewell to the Corinthian this morning, as you disembark in Stockholm, Sweden’s capital city. An archipelago within an archipelago, the city occupies a cluster of 14 islands floating among 24,000 that make up a 60-mile chain. Today, you’ll see the charms that lure one in five Swedes to live in the capital city, as you enjoy an included sightseeing tour here. You’ll visit the Stadshuset, the romantic City Hall building famous for hosting the annual Nobel Prize banquet. Designed in 1923, City Hall was constructed using eight million red bricks and 19 million chips of gilt mosaic. The Stadshuset is not just the city’s seat of government, but is also a national symbol, as the building’s 300-foot tower, topped with three golden crowns that represent Sweden’s coat of arms, will attest.

    After lunch at a local restaurant, check into your hotel. You’ll enjoy a walk around the vicinity of your hotel to introduce you to the area in which you’ll be staying.

    This evening, join your fellow travelers over an included dinner at your hotel, toasting your journey with a Farewell Drink. As they say in Sweden, “Skål!” (“Cheers!”).

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    After breakfast, you’ll be transferred to the airport for your flight home, or continue on our Stockholm, Sweden post-trip extension.

Stockholm Copenhagen Reverse Direction Expand All
  • hidden

    Depart the U.S. today on your flight to Stockholm, Sweden. Please refer to your personal air itinerary for exact departure and arrival times.

  • hidden

    Arriving in Sweden, you’ll be met at the airport by a Grand Circle representative and assisted to your hotel. Grow acquainted with the area around your hotel with an orientation walk before an afternoon free to explore Stockholm independently, with lunch and dinner on your own.

  • hidden

    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    After breakfast this morning, take in the sights of Stockholm, Sweden’s capital city. An archipelago within an archipelago, the city occupies a cluster of 14 islands floating among 24,000 that make up a 60-mile chain. Today, you’ll see the charms that lure one in five Swedes to live in the capital city, as you enjoy an included sightseeing tour here. You’ll visit the Stadshuset, the romantic City Hall building famous for hosting the annual Nobel Prize banquet. Designed in 1923, City Hall was constructed using eight million red bricks and 19 million chips of gilt mosaic. The Stadshuset is not just the city’s seat of government, but is also a national symbol, as the building’s 300-foot tower, topped with three golden crowns that represent Sweden’s coat of arms, will attest.

    After lunch in a local restaurant, you’ll transfer to the pier to embark the Corinthian.

    During your cruise, you’ll receive a “port talk” about the pier area and town prior to arrival, so you can make the best use of your free time. This evening, you’ll gather for your first port talk. Then get better acquainted with your ship’s Captain and crew during a Welcome Dinner. As they say in Scandinavia, “Smaklig måltid!” (“Enjoy your meal!”).

    Tonight, set sail for your first destination: Helsinki, Finland.

  • hidden

    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    This morning, we drop anchor in Helsinki, Finland’s capital city. After breakfast onboard, enjoy a tour of Helsinki with a local guide. During your half-day tour of the city, known as “the Daughter of the Baltic,” you’ll visit the Sibelius Monument, a collection of 600 steel pipes arranged into a wave-like sculpture as a tribute to the composer, as well as the Temppeliaukio Kirkko, a church beautifully hewn out of solid granite. Your tour showcases Market Square, a perennial outdoor market, and Senate Square, undoubtedly the pride of the city. Senate Square is ringed by a treasury of Empire Neoclassic buildings, including the 19th-century Lutheran Cathedral, whose central tower dominates the skyline. As you wend your way through Helsinki, notice how the sea is such an integral part of they city. Helsinki is built over peninsulas, curving around bays and spilling out across islands that are linked by bridges, causeways, and boats of all descriptions.

    After lunch onboard, enjoy time to explore Helsinki on your own.

    This evening, as we set sail for St. Petersburg, Russia, dinner is onboard.

  • hidden

    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    St. Petersburg, founded as the new capital of the Russian Empire more than 300 years ago, was the vision and creation of Tsar Peter I, who named it after his patron saint, Peter. This beautiful showcase of a city, covering 150 square miles, is a synthesis of both European and Russian styles, with elements of both East and West. Pushkin called this city “Peter the Great’s Window to the West.” St. Petersburg has more than 40 picturesque islands, more than 60 canals, and hundreds of lovely bridges, and it is considered one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

    After breakfast, enjoy a panoramic tour of St. Petersburg, including a visit to St. Isaac’s Cathedral. This is the largest church in the city, built originally to be the main church of the Russian Empire. The dome of the cathedral, which dominates the city’s skyline, is gilded with more than 200 pounds of gold, and the interior is elaborately decorated with exquisite mosaics, icons, malachite, and lapis lazuli. This grand church can seat 14,000 worshippers. Although the church was closed after the 1917 Revolution, it reopened as a museum in 1931, and services for worshippers were again introduced in 1990.

    This afternoon, after a light lunch at a local restaurant, you’ll continue exploring St. Petersburg, with an included visit to the Hermitage Museum. Formerly the Winter Palace and home of the tsars, today this is one of the most splendid museums in the world. Built by the Empress Elizabeth, daughter of Peter I, the palace became part of the Hermitage, originated in 1764 when Catherine the Great began her private art collection. Today, more than 1,000 rooms house nearly three million exhibits and displays representing some of the world’s greatest art.

    The staggering collection of art and paintings ranges from ancient Egypt to early 20th-century Europe, and is set in a complex of buildings magnificently and lavishly adorned with gold leaf, malachite, jasper, agate, and marble. Marvel at masterpieces by da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, a full range of French Impressionists, Van Gogh, Rodin, and many more of the world’s great artists. After your visit to the Hermitage, return to your ship in the afternoon.

    Tonight, enjoy dinner onboard your ship. You might elect to join our optional excursion to a folk show at Nikolayevsky Palace, enjoying live music, dancing, and games in a 19th-century setting.

  • hidden

    This morning, enjoy an included excursion to the magnificent summer residence of the Russian royalty at Peterhof, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1714, Peter the Great asked for a “Versailles by the Sea.” The site evolved into a grand palace atop the hill surrounded by a park. Visit Catherine’s Wing, a small palace on the grounds, and see the palace’s remarkable Grand Cascade, an extraordinary fountain ensemble made up of three waterfalls, nearly 150 fountains shooting more than 2,000 jets of water, and a myriad of statues and sculptures.

    After lunch aboard ship, you may return to discover the city as you wish—browse some shops, visit monuments, and learn more about Russia's rich culture, or sip coffee at a café and watch the life of St. Petersburg unfold around you.

    Enjoy dinner onboard this evening.

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    Your ship arrives in Tallinn, Estonia this morning. A wonderfully preserved city of the old Hanseatic League, this ancient walled port on the Baltic is a UNESCO World Heritage Site filled with remarkable fortresses, castles, and cathedrals. Medieval Tallinn had six gates, all bastion-forts complete with moats and drawbridges.

    You'll gain insight into Estonia's premier city during this morning's guided tour. Tallinn’s Old Town is still encircled by city walls, punctuated with many stone towers rising above red-tiled roofs. Within the city walls, the streets remain much as they were when Danish rulers built them in the 13th century. This historic city center is divided into the Lower Town and the Upper Town. In the Lower Town, the 600-year-old Town Hall—the best-preserved of its kind in northern Europe—has a tower that presides dramatically over Town Hall Square (Raejoka plats). The Upper Town is on Toompea Hill, where two landmarks that originated in the 13th century still stand: Toompea Castle (now the meeting place for the Estonian Parliament) and the Dome Church (Estonia’s largest Lutheran sanctuary). Many of the city’s historic buildings reflect the prosperity it enjoyed between the 14th and 16th centuries. Under German control, Tallinn flourished during these years as a trade port in the Hanseatic League. Later periods of Swedish and Russian rule also left their marks on Tallinn, whose rich layers of history you’ll delve into during your tour.

    After lunch aboard the Corinthian, you can set out independently to explore more of the city at your own pace. You may want to visit Kiek-in-de-Kok (Look-into-the-Kitchen), a bastion built in 1470. At the time, it was the tallest building in Estonia and earned its name because it was said that watchmen could peer into the kitchens of the houses below. Or you might take a walk in Town Hall Square. Originally called Market Square, excavations show that it was a market as long as a thousand years ago. Here the 14th-century Town Hall has been preserved almost intact in its original Gothic form, and still serves as the City Hall.

    This evening, join your traveling companions for an included dinner aboard ship as you cruise toward Riga, Latvia.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    Set close to the mouth of the Daugava River, which travels from the Baltic Sea into Russia, Riga was historically an important trade port. Its prosperity also made it a target for conquest. Before Latvia declared itself an independent nation in 1918, Riga was claimed by Russia, Sweden, Lithuania, and Germany. As a diverse, thriving city with a prominent upper class, Riga experienced radical change under occupation by the Soviets and Nazis. Buildings from Riga’s most prosperous eras—particularly the Art Nouveau period—still stand throughout the city, as you’ll discover on a city tour by motorcoach and on foot. You’ll enjoy special focus on the Art Nouveau era as you explore a district rich with facades from the early 20th-century period in which architecture became romantic, favoring natural and mythological embellishments.

    After lunch onboard, you may enjoy time ashore in Riga. Perhaps you’ll visit Riga’s Old Town, a dizzying collection of cobbled lanes, gargoyle-adorned buildings, and lovingly restored 17th-century architectural treasures under UNESCO World Heritage Site protection. You’ll also have a chance to explore the city’s Central Market—the largest market in Europe—during an exclusive Discovery Series event. Located in converted German Zeppelin hangars from the 1930s, the market's pavilions encompass more than three-quarters of a million square feet of space and are also under UNESCO protection.

    Dinner is aboard ship this evening.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    Join us this morning for our optional Rundale Palace tour. A masterpiece of Baroque and Rococo style, 18th-century Rundale Palace was built on the orders of Ernst Johann Biron, the Duke of Courtland, and the Russian Empress he loved, Anna Ioannovna. The palace boasts opulent chambers, as well as extensive French gardens. You’ll tour the palace and the rose garden, before enjoying lunch at a local restaurant.

    Or, explore the city at your own pace. Perhaps you’ll pay a visit to the Nordic wooden dwellings of Kipsala Island, or build upon yesterday’s discoveries with a visit to the recently opened Riga Art Nouveau Museum, located in the former apartment of Latvian architect Konstantins Pekšens. Return to the ship for lunch.

    This evening, learn more about the evolution of the independence movement in the Baltic states during a Singing Revolution discussion, an exclusive Discovery Series event. Dinner is onboard the ship as you cruise toward Visby, Sweden.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    On Gotland Island, the city of Visby has existed for more than a thousand years, with its signature ringmur (“ringwall”) encircling the town since the 13th century. Reachable only by boat or plane, and beloved as a holiday destination for Swedes, the “city of ruins and roses” is rich with historical artifacts, earning it a designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Enjoy an included panoramic tour of Visby as its history unfolds before you, its hundreds of warehouses and merchant homes telling the story of its heyday as a major port between Russia and Western Europe for the Hanseatic League.

    Return to the Corinthian for an included lunch, then go ashore in Visby once more to make discoveries on your own, or stroll with your Program Director on a leisurely walk along the cobblestone streets.

    Enjoy dinner onboard as we cruise toward Gdańsk, Poland.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    After breakfast this morning, you’ll dock in Gdańsk and then transfer to Gdynia for an included tour of an amber factory, an exclusive Discovery Series event. The Baltic region is home to the world’s largest deposit of amber, known specifically as “Baltic amber” (or colloquially as “Polish gold” in Poland). The amber—or fossilized tree resin—is 44 million years old around the Baltic Sea and is mined to make such things as jewelry, table lamps, and even furniture. The more valuable pieces have been known to contain species of now-extinct insects or plants.

    After, you’ll share a Home-Hosted Lunch with a local family before transferring back to Gdańsk for a guided tour of the Stare Miasto (Old Town). Gdańsk is a Polish city with a Baltic vibe—a maritime city that’s been around for a millennium and has fluctuated between great prosperity and tragic destruction. While Gdańsk still shows its scars from the tumult of World War II, this unique city offers a wealth of architectural beauty and a myriad of activities. Wander past the town hall, where stands the Neptune Fountain, rumored to have once spouted Gdańsk’s trademark liqueur, Goldwasser, instead of water. You’ll also marvel at the city’s many gates—including the Green Gate, the Golden Gate, and the Upland Gate—and the Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers, three 138-foot-tall steel crosses at the entrance to the city’s shipyard. A sudden spike in food costs in 1970 led to mass riots throughout northern Poland that left at least 40 dead and more than 1,000 wounded. The monument is the first to commemorate the victims of a communist regime.

    At the conclusion of your tour, you’ll have time to further explore the city’s Old Town. Perhaps you’ll discover one of Gdańsk’s many cafés, bookstores, or shops (where you can admire examples of northern Poland’s famed amber jewelry).

    Later, you’ll make your way to Katedra Oliwska, the Oliwa cathedral, for an organ concerto. The cathedral is the longest church in Poland and houses two organs—a smaller choir organ, and the famed “great organ”—one of the largest in the world.

    This evening, enjoy dinner onboard as your ship sails toward Rønne, Denmark.

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    • Meals included:
    • Accommodations:

    After breakfast onboard, explore Rønne during a guided city tour. Located on the island of Bornholm (considered the “pearl of the Baltic Sea” because of its breathtaking scenery), Rønne is a town of cobbled streets, half-timbered houses, and brightly-painted buildings. During your tour, you’ll visit Store Torv (the town’s largest square, where the Danes sell produce, clothing, and granite jewelry during market days), Bornholms Teater (Denmark’s oldest theater), and the octagonal Rønne lighthouse (built in 1880 and operational until it was decommissioned in 1989).

    After your guided tour of the town’s center, you’ll make your way to Hjorths Fabrik—a ceramic museum showcasing the long history of pottery-making in Rønne—for an exclusive Discovery Series event. Bornholm residents have been digging into the island’s rich deposits of clay and creating unusual and whimsical pots, plates, and cups since the early 18th century. The Hjorth ceramic factory opened in 1858 and was operational for more than a century, before it shut down in 1993. Today, the museum (still run by the Hjorth family) houses ceramic artifacts from the early 18th century, pieces made when the factory was operational, and works done by modern-day Bornholm potters.

    Return to the ship for lunch onboard. The rest of the afternoon is yours to continue your discoveries. Perhaps you’ll choose to visit one of the town’s many clockmakers, a tradition dating back to 1744. The island was once known for its unique grandfather clocks until the craft disappeared after World War II. In recent years, the tradition has revived and the clocks’ hourly chimes can be heard singing throughout the streets.

    This evening, enjoy a Captain’s Farewell Drink and Farewell Dinner.

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    Bid farewell to the Corinthian this morning, and take in the sights of Copenhagen during a panoramic tour, giving you a glimpse of the city’s colorful houses, picturesque canals, charming pedestrian squares, and innovative modern architectural designs. After lunch on your own, check into your hotel. You’ll enjoy a walk around the vicinity of your hotel to introduce you to the area in which you’ll be staying.

    This evening, join your fellow travelers over an included dinner at your hotel, toasting your journey with a Farewell Drink. As they say in Sweden, “Skål!” (“Cheers!”).

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    • Meals included:

    After breakfast, you’ll be transferred to the airport for your flight home, or continue on our Copenhagen, Denmark post-trip extension.

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Ratings based on percentage of travelers who rated these features "Excellent".

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Weather & Regional

Before you travel, we encourage you to learn about the region of the world you'll discover on this trip. From weather and currency information to details on population, geography, and local history, you'll find a comprehensive introduction to your destinations below.

Visit our “What to Know” page to find information about the level of activity to expect, vaccination information resources, and visa requirements specific to this vacation.

What to Know

For more detailed information about this trip, download our Travel Handbook below. This document covers a wide range of information on specific areas of your trip, from passport, visa, and medical requirements; to the currencies of the countries you’ll visit and the types of electrical outlets you’ll encounter. This handbook is written expressly for this itinerary. For your convenience, we've highlighted our travelers' most common areas of interest on this page.

Download the Travel Handbook

What to Expect

Pacing

  • 13 days, with 10 nights aboard the Corinthian; and 2 single-night stays

Physical requirements

  • Travelers using mobility aids or with medical conditions that might require immediate attention will not be able to board the Corinthian
  • You must be able to walk 3 miles unassisted and participate in 2 hours of physical activities each day

Climate

  • Daytime temperatures range from 58-77°F during cruising season

Terrain

  • Travel over uneven surfaces, including unpaved paths, steep hills, stairs, and cobblestone

Transportation

  • Travel by 45-passenger coach and 98-passenger small ship

Small Ship Cruising

  • If docked at a pier, gangway incline can be steep
  • Weather conditions and tides may require adjustments to your itinerary

Cuisine

  • Meals will be a mix of local specialties and familiar American standards
  • Meals onboard feature a variety of entrée options, including vegetarian

Travel Documents

Passport

Your passport should meet these requirements for this itinerary

  • It should be valid for at least 6 months after your scheduled return to the U.S.
  • It should have the recommended number of blank pages (refer to the handbook for details).
  • The blank pages must be labeled “Visas” at the top. Pages labeled “Amendments and Endorsements” are not acceptable.

Visas

U.S. citizens will need a visa (or visas) for this trip. In addition, there may be other entry requirements that also need to be met. For your convenience, we’ve included a quick reference list, organized by country:

Travelers who are booked on this vacation will be sent a complete Visa Packet— with instructions, applications, and a list of visa fees—approximately 100 days prior to their departure. (Because many countries limit the validity of their visa from the date it is issued, or have a specific time window for when you can apply, we do not recommend applying too early.)

If you are not a U.S. citizen, do not travel with a U.S. passport, or will be traveling independently before/after this trip, then your entry requirements may be different. Please check with the appropriate embassy or a visa servicing company. To contact our recommended visa servicing company, PVS International, call toll-free at 1-800-556-9990.

Vaccinations Information

For a detailed and up-to-date list of vaccinations that are recommended for this trip, please visit the CDC’s “Traveler’s Health” website. You can also refer to the handbook for details.

Before Your Trip

Before you leave on your vacation, there are at least four health-related things you should do. Please check the handbook for specifics, but for now, here’s the short list:

Step 1: Check with the CDC for their recommendations for the countries you’ll be visiting.
Step 2: Have a medical checkup with your doctor.
Step 3: Pick up any necessary medications, both prescription and over-the-counter.
Step 4: Have a dental and/or eye checkup. (Recommended, but less important than steps 1-3.)

What to Bring

In an effort to help you bring less, we have included checklists within the handbook, which have been compiled from suggestions by Program Directors and former travelers. The lists are only jumping-off points—they offer recommendations based on experience, but not requirements. You might also want to refer to the climate charts in the handbook or online weather forecasts before you pack. Refer to the handbook for details.

Accommodations

Main Trip

  • Corinthian

    The Corinthian is 290 feet long and carries 98 passengers in 49 outside-facing suites—each at least 215 sq. ft. in area. All suites feature individual climate control, mini-refrigerator, safe, telephone, TV, DVD/CD player, a sitting area, hair dryer, and a private bathroom with shower. An elevator serves all passenger decks. The ship’s well-appointed common areas include a restaurant, two lounges and a library with Internet access, and provide congenial spaces to get to know your fellow travelers as you cruise. Enjoy discoveries on land in a group of no more than 25 travelers led by your own expert, resident Program Director.

Main Trip

  • Copenhagen Admiral Hotel

    Copenhagen, Denmark | Rating: Superior First Class

    The Copenhagen Admiral Hotel is centrally located on the waterfront of the city’s picturesque harbor. The hotel building is a renovated 18th-century warehouse, and each room includes complimentary wireless Internet access, coffee- and tea-making facilities, and private bath with hair dryer.

  • Radisson Blu Waterfront

    Stockholm, Sweden | Rating: Deluxe

    Within walking distance of the Waterfront Congress Centre, the deluxe Radisson Blu is well-positioned in the city’s center. The hotel features a restaurant and bar, as well as a health club. The hotel’s 414 rooms each offer air-conditioning, flatscreen TV, coffee-and tea-making facilities, and private bath with hair dryer.

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  • Copenhagen Admiral Hotel

    Copenhagen, Denmark | Rating: Superior First Class

    The Copenhagen Admiral Hotel is centrally located on the waterfront of the city’s picturesque harbor. The hotel building is a renovated 18th-century warehouse, and each room includes complimentary wireless Internet access, coffee- and tea-making facilities, and private bath with hair dryer.

  • Radisson Blu Waterfront

    Stockholm, Sweden | Rating: Deluxe

    Within walking distance of the Waterfront Congress Centre, the deluxe Radisson Blu is well-positioned in the city’s center. The hotel features a restaurant and bar, as well as a health club. The hotel’s 414 rooms each offer air-conditioning, flatscreen TV, coffee-and tea-making facilities, and private bath with hair dryer.

Flight Information

Flight Options to Personalize Your Trip

You can choose to stay longer before or after your trip on your own, or combine two vacations to maximize your value.

  • Extend your vacation and lower your per day cost with our optional pre- and post-trip excursions
  • Choose our standard air routing, or work with us to select the airline and routing you prefer
  • Make your own international flight arrangements directly with the airline, applying frequent flyer miles if available
  • International airport transfers to and from your ship or hotel, including meet and greet service, are available for purchase
  • Stay overnight in a connecting city before or after your trip
  • Request to arrive a few days early to get a fresh start on your vacation
  • Choose to "break away" before or after your trip, spending additional days or weeks on your own
  • Combine your choice of Grand Circle Cruise Line vacations to maximize your value
  • Upgrade to business or premium class

The air options listed above may involve additional airfare costs based on your specific choices.

Or, when you make your reservation, you can choose our standard air routing, for which approximate travel times are shown below.

Standard Air Routing

w/out standard air $5795
w/ standard air $7095
Approximate travel times

Pay Early & Save up to 10% with our Good Buy Plan

It’s simple: The earlier you reserve and pay in full by check or electronic funds transfer, the more you’ll save on any 2015 departure of Grand Baltic Sea Voyage. You’ll maximize your value—saving up to a full 10% off your total trip price—when you pay in full twelve months or more prior to departure. Even if you don’t reserve a full year in advance, you’ll still save, as seen in the example below. Plus, there’s no risk in reserving early with our Lowest Price Guarantee. You’ll receive our lowest cruise-only price if we reduce your main trip price more than 60 days from departure.

This example demonstrates how you can save, based on a 8/26/15 departure:

  ORIGINAL PRICE
per person
SAVE 10%
when you reserve and pay in full by 8/26/14
SAVE 7%
when you reserve and pay in full by 9/26/14
SAVE 5%
when you reserve
and pay in full by 11/26/14
Small Ship Cruise Tour-only price: $6795 $6116 $6319 $6455
Add a 3-night Copenhagen, Denmark extension: $1195 $1076 $1111 $1135
Add international airfare out of New York: $1300 $1170 $1209 $1235
Total price per person $9290 $8362 $8639 $8825
Total savings per couple   $1856 $1302 $930

Maximize your value by using the money you save for a cabin upgrade or optional trip extension

Call Now 1-800-221-2610

Three Nations, One Spirit

The seeds of protest and the Baltic Capitals’ resurgence

An estimated two million Baltic people all joined hands to physically and symbolically link their three capital cities of Vilnius, Riga, and Tallinn.

Eastern Europe may still seem closed off to many—after all, most of what Americans know about Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania was associated with the Eastern Bloc. But while the Soviet shadow still lingers in the architecture and monuments, the flags raised in their capitals have changed to reflect national and ethnic identities. Regardless of the political affiliation of the countries, one fact remains steadfast: The Baltic people love their homeland, and they aren’t afraid to fight—or, in some cases sing—to protect their unique cultural and ethnic identities.

The “Singing Revolution:” Tallin’s peaceful protest

Between the years of 1987 and 1991, yearning to shake off the yoke of Soviet rule, the Baltic people began to engage in a series of public singing demonstrations—often chanting national anthems and cherished folk songs. Soviet officials discouraged these patriotic sing-alongs, wanting to unify disparate populations under the USSR umbrella. As these once-localized musical outbursts became larger and more fervent, the voices of the Baltic people echoed all the way to the highest offices of the Soviets.

On September 11, 1988, approximately 300,000 people gathered at the Tallin Song Festival Arena to sing national songs and hymns, while rock musicians supported and encouraged them onstage. More than a quarter of the entire Estonian population was in attendance—how’s that for unity? Song festivals continue to be popular across all three Baltic countries, beloved as a way to champion national identity and help preserve the past.

Chain of Freedom: peaceful protest or “nationalist hysteria”?

As it turned out, the Singing Revolution was only the beginning of a march towards democracy. On August 23, 1989, an estimated two million Baltic people all joined hands to physically and symbolically link their three capital cities of Vilnius, Lithuania; Riga, Latvia; and Tallinn, Estonia. This human chain—referred to as the “Baltic Way” or, more locally, “Chain of Freedom”—extended over a length that exceeded 400 miles. While this may sound like a feat straight out of the Guinness Book of World Records, the message was serious: It was an expression of joint solidarity against decades of Soviet rule. The year of the chain marked the 50th anniversary of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact that annexed the Baltic States to the USSR. A growing number of activists, eager to bring the issue of illegal Soviet occupation to the world stage, organized the human chain.

Each state had its own pro-independence movement to help coordinate the effort: the Popular Front of Estonia (Rahvarinne), the Popular Front of Latvia (Latvijas Tautas Fronte), and the Reform Movement in Lithuania (Sajudis). Local support was encouraging; thousands of signatures had been gathered in multiple petitions, and organizers provided free bus transportation to ensure an unbroken chain in rural areas. Estonia declared the day to be a public holiday, and many businesses closed to allow employee participation. Aided by radio broadcasts to help organize the massive demonstration, the participants joined hands for 15 minutes.

Although it would take an additional two years of diplomatic and political victories, the Chain of Freedom was ultimately successful: Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia were recognized as independent states by the end of 1991. Though freedom from Soviet control took over 50 years to attain, the citizens of these three nations adapted quickly to their hard-won liberties. The transformation of the neighborhood of Užupis in Vilnius demonstrates how the creativity and revolutionary spirit of the pro-national movements lives on in their current democratic states.

Užupis: The bohemian utopia

Located just one mile east of Vilnius University (the oldest in Lithuania), Užupis is an eccentric neighborhood that makes for a perfect detour during a free afternoon in Vilnius. In the native Lithuanian tongue, Užupis literally means “on the other side of the river.” In this case, the river in question is the Vilnia River. But a more familiar moniker could just as easily be “on the wrong side of the tracks.” Užupis was nearly deserted during World War II, when Nazi forces drove out the mostly Jewish population. For years, the empty buildings and abandoned storefronts became a haven for criminals, prostitutes, the homeless, and others that lived—some intentionally and others by circumstance—on the fringes of society.

Over the past several centuries, the population has shifted from medieval craftsmen to Jewish communities, but the bohemian spirit of the neighborhood is forever sealed in the DNA of the colorful, dilapidated buildings. Nowadays, Užupis is populated by a new mix of lifestyles: students living cheaply, artists seeking inspiration, and the free spirits who balk at the idea of living in the more “respectable” capital city of Vilnius. The muses of art, craftsmanship, and self-reliance still seem to haunt these streets.

In the place where a former statue of Lenin once stood watch over the town, a new icon has emerged, one that is far more fitting for the artistic and eclectic population: Frank Zappa, the American musician, composer, and kindred free spirit.