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Author: captainlarry

Joined: 4/24/2010
Posts: 394
Trips Taken: 10
Traveler Since: 2002

November 08, 2012
The following story did not happen on a trip sponsored by either GCT or OAT, but it was an important lesson for me, and perhaps others might benefit as well. On another forum there was a thread about what passengers do that annoy flight attendants. That was a follow up to one about what flight attendants do to annoy passengers. The story i relate happened less than two weeks ago.
 
We had an interesting experience on a recent flight. I was annoyed by the flight attendant and I'm sure she was annoyed by me. But a very "senior" flight attendant became the mediator, made our flight very pleasant, and seemed to enjoy the interaction with us for the remainder of the flight.

We had the first two seats in economy, so we had no seat in front of us under which we could place any carry-ons. So everythnig had to go into the overhead bins. All of the overhead bins in the vicinity of our seats were already filled. I became annoyed when the flight attendant suggested that the only alternative was that I go farther back in the airplane and search for space in an overhead. That would have insured that I would be absolutely the last passenger to deplane, even though I was seated in the exit row. I got grouchy.

That's when Elizabeth, a flight attendant with over forty years of service, overheard the exchange. She allowed us to store our carry-ons in her personal closet/locker. That made them readily accessible during the flight and, equally importantly, gave us the opportunity to be the first ones off the plane. I was no longer grouchy.

Elizabeth sat in the jump seat immediately in front of us for take off. We carried on a conversation with her and we became quite friendly and got to know a bit about each other. Elizabeth's service area was first class, but she still checked on us regularly and even offered us some "first class" wine. We were grateful but declined. We really appreciated Elizabeth's intervention on our behalf, and I believe that Elizabeth appreciated the opportunity to have a friendly conversation that did not revolve around service on the airplane. Just before landing she presented us each with the plastic "wings" they typically give to youngsters even though we are much closer to second childhood than first.

I was happy to return Elizabeth's attitude to her, and I'm glad that she did not return my initial attitude to me.

 

Author: gobuckeyes

Joined: 7/7/2010
Posts: 157
Trips Taken: 13
Traveler Since: 2005

November 09, 2012

You should send a copy of this (identifying the flight number, date, etc.) to the airlines so they know what an outstanding employees this flight attendant is. It shouldn't be too hard to find the address of the airline's "Customer Relations Dept"; with some airlines you can find it and/or just send it on via their website (example below) and it shouldn't be too hard for them to ID the specific employee and add it to her personnel records. Any service company always likes to hear when one of their employees does something good; unfortunately people with a bad experience are 100 times more likey to complain than someone who had a good experience sending in a compliment, etc. Who knows a good letter on the flight attendant may help her get a deserving promotion, better evaluation, and/or performance award.

Anyway that's what I would do.

For American Airlines: http://www.aa.com/contactAA/viewContactAAAccess.do?selectedFileName=aaCustomerRelations.html&selectedCategory=Customer+Relations

 

 

Author: captainlarry

Joined: 4/24/2010
Posts: 394
Trips Taken: 10
Traveler Since: 2002

November 09, 2012

Already done, Brutus, but thanks for the suggestion.

Author: wattsed

Joined: 3/30/2010
Posts: 136
Trips Taken: 3
Countries Visited:

All seven continents, 113 countries and all states except Hawaii and Idaho.Plus some interesting places that are not countries such as The zores, Falkland Islands, South Georgia, etc.

Traveler Since: 2010

November 09, 2012

I think airlines could solve a bunch of their bording problems and problems like this if overhead bins were also assigned by seat and row number...the real problem is a bunch of people who have seats further back in the plane always want to put their "carry on" (which in many cases should have been checked) in the first open space they see which leaves later bording passengers little alternative than to go to the "back of the bus" which also causes problems on de-planing...

Author: gobuckeyes

Joined: 7/7/2010
Posts: 157
Trips Taken: 13
Traveler Since: 2005

November 10, 2012

I think airlines could solve a bunch of their bording problems and problems like this if....

they would actually limit everyone to 1 carry on (no exceptions) and make passengers check everything else; and not charge extra for the 1st two checked bags.

TSA screening would go a lot faster too.

 

 

 

Author: grammyflo

Joined: 3/15/2010
Posts: 168
Trips Taken: 13
Traveler Since: 2002

November 10, 2012

My pet peeve is people who are allowed to bring on a small suitcase with a piggyback carryon and women who have a big purse and computer besides.  They always seem to pack all those things in the overhead that is supposedly assigned to me.

Someday if you see a headline that some old lady coldcocked an errant passenger, man or women, it will be me they are leading off the plane in handcuffs. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

 

Author: pauline

Joined: 3/9/2010
Posts: 962
Trips Taken: 11
Countries Visited:

England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Malta, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, China, Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Canada, Russia, Ukraine

Traveler Since: 1999

November 10, 2012

I try to sit as far forward as I can and in an aisle seat.  While I'm trying not to get bopped on the head by people's backpacks, I observe them putting stuff in the very first overhead compartments they come to and then heading towards the back of the plane.  And then the people in those seats try to get their stuff in, and there's no room!  What I don't understand is why.  Wouldn't they be happier with their luggage closer to where they're sitting in case they wanted to get something out?

Author: luisa

Joined: 3/13/2010
Posts: 515
Trips Taken: 8
Countries Visited:

Bahamas, Cayman Islands, Canada, Mexico, Spain, France, Monoco, Croatia, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Morocco, Chile, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji

Traveler Since: 2006

November 11, 2012

Here's my "attitude" story.

A few years ago on an Air France flight I had an aisle seat fairly close to the front, maybe Row 10 or 12. I put my medium sized canvas carryon in the overhead and sat down and saw man put one of his two large carryons into an overhead closer to the front, then walk down the aisle looking for space for his other one. He came to my row, shoved my bag to the side and put his hard-sided suitcase in lengthwise. When getting ready for takeoff, the attendant couldn't close the bin door so took my bag out and moved his sideways so it took up the entire space.

She said "I'll find another space for this," and I said said "Excuse me, that's my bag. This is my seat and the man who put that bag up there is sitting up front."

So she put my bag back, took his and walked toward the front with the too-big to fit bag. As someone else wrote, this type of situation could be avoided if the airlines enforced the carryon limits.

Author: pauline

Joined: 3/9/2010
Posts: 962
Trips Taken: 11
Countries Visited:

England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Malta, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, China, Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Canada, Russia, Ukraine

Traveler Since: 1999

November 11, 2012

Here's another "attitude" story.  It's similar to an apocryphal one about a South African woman, but this a true happening that I witnessed. 

I was on a flight from Kansas City to Boston in the days when you had to check in again at the gate.  I was flying first class on my way home from a family party in Omaha.  Standing behind me in the line were two couples flying together and discussing the possibility of the plane being overbooked and volunteering to give up their seats, and they decided to do it when they checked in.  Well, the plane wasn't overbooked, so they lost their seat assignments but not their tickets.  Their seats, four together, were given to a rather poor looking family of two adults and two children.  And those people raised such a fuss and carried on so, that I thought the police would have to come on board and remove them.  Suddenly, from the back of the plane came the family ushered by two cabin attendants into four first class seats that were not taken.

The man sitting next to me and I called the attendants over and gave them our business cards in case they got into trouble about this.  We volunteered to stand as witnesses for them.  But they didn't think it would be necessary, and it wasn't.

We were left with such a good feeling about the situation.  And I've never forgotten it.

Author: nancyf

Joined: 4/26/2010
Posts: 155
Trips Taken: 7
Countries Visited:

43 of the 50 United States, including Hawaii and Alaska, England , France , Italy , Spain, Germany, Netherlands, Africa (Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe. South Africa), Israel, Canada, the Carribbean, Peru, going to Egypt & Jordan in February 2011 ( canceled due to the unrest there, but I will take this trip later!), China, Russia, Kenya, Turkey, Greece, Malta, Sicily.

Traveler Since: 2007

November 11, 2012

Pauline--love your story about the seats. People who act like buffoons should be treated as such. Sometimes, what goes around comes around. Karma, of sorts.

Wattsed--I agree with you that assigned seats should be given assigned overhead space, right at the same spot. And when noticing like Luisa did that someone put their carryon over a space quite different than the one assigned to them, point this out to the attendants. Some people have no regard for others' "spaces and rights.".

And the airlines are partially to blame (not for people's bad manners) for creating this carryon nightmare, since they now charge for checking luggage. I don't know the solution (other than not charging) but something needs to be done.

Author: svncontinents

Joined: 11/25/2011
Posts: 230
Trips Taken: 13
Traveler Since: 2007

December 21, 2012

 Carry-on space is so dear on flights that the boarding experience which once was pleasant and unhurried now becomes a race in order to insure that one gets a space for one's carry-on in the overhead compartment close to one's seat.  We agree that those passangers with what amounts to small suitcases should be required to check them, as we've seen one passanger take up an entire overhead bid with they 'carry-on.'  And we've seen it much more than once.  We don't understand why the airlines don't charge for this; they charge for everything else.  But we have found a solution to the problem.  We got Global Entry, and no matter when we get off the plane, we're usually the among the first to clear immigration.

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