Travel Forum

Our Travel Forum was created to provide you with the opportunity to connect with other travelers who share your passion for travel. Sign into "My Account" and you’ll be able to write reviews, share your travel experiences, and post questions for other travelers. Not yet registered? It’s simple to create an account, membership is free, and it only takes a moment to join. Once you do, you’ll be able to write reviews, share your travel experiences, and post questions for other travelers. If you have a specific customer service or quality assurance question, please contact our Traveler Support Team by calling 1-800-221-0814. We value the contributions of our travelers. Please familiarize yourself with the guidelines for participation before you begin.

Author: reimer

Joined: 6/18/2013
Posts: 1
Traveler Since: 2009

January 06, 2014

 I'm from the Buffalo, NY area so I know how to dress for winter.  How important is it to bring rubberized pants?  I was just going to bring my ski pants.  Will the boots provided be enough or should I also bring boots?  What spring/summer clothes and footwear will be necessary for the pre and post trips?  Any other packing suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

 

Author: wattsed

Joined: 3/30/2010
Posts: 136
Countries Visited:

All seven continents, 113 countries and all states except Hawaii and Idaho.Plus some interesting places that are not countries such as The zores, Falkland Islands, South Georgia, etc.

Traveler Since: 2010

January 06, 2014

Ski pants or rain pants will be perfectly fine...wind could be more of a concern than rain/snow.  The boots provided will be more than enough with a couple pair of socks or similar and you will not need any other boots---in addition, another pair of boot would not fit in the boots provided.  I think most people over think the cold in the parts of Antarctica as along the shoreline it is relatively warm at least  for those from the North who are used to similar weather conditions...We had a couple people actually strip down to shorts and t-shirt when I went in February...they looked a little funny in shorts and t-shirt wearing their boots!!

Author: esther

Joined: 10/8/2012
Posts: 10
Traveler Since: 2009

January 06, 2014

 re: Rubber boots for Antarctica          I went to Walmart and bought tall rubber boots. Cost was minimal - under $20.    When I went to buy them, I wore sport shoes and bought boots big enough wear the sport shoes inside.    . You'll be walking on sandy, pebbly ground, often covered with bird poop.  When walking on slippery ground, this  is more stable.   When you return to the ship, staff members will wash off your boots.     Since they took so much room in my luggage, I left them on the ship for others to use. 

Author: wattsed

Joined: 3/30/2010
Posts: 136
Countries Visited:

All seven continents, 113 countries and all states except Hawaii and Idaho.Plus some interesting places that are not countries such as The zores, Falkland Islands, South Georgia, etc.

Traveler Since: 2010

January 06, 2014

Boots are provided by GCT so why would you want to buy a pair and take up luggage space?

Author: retirement

Joined: 7/30/2012
Posts: 11
Traveler Since: 2006

January 08, 2014

Agree the boots provided are fine.  I ordered the boot size recommended for my shoe size and they worked perfect. They are heavy rubber slip on, no liners, so you want to bring heavy socks, (or 2 pair of regular socks which I did). Believe me; you want their good heavy (totally waterproof) rubber boots on when getting in and out of the rafts on the wet landings. Keep in mind you will be walking through Penguin doo doo, so your boots get hosed off each time you return to the ship, another reason to have on the good rubber boots. No one on our tour appeared to have any problem with the boots. The gear provided by OAT, worked perfect. The Parka's run a bit large. I normally would wear a medium (size 8 - 10), the size small gave me plenty of room, and boy do they keep you toasty warm. Another recommendation I have for keeping your hands nice and dry is to wear a pair of regular kitchen rubber gloves under your other gloves. They kept my hands nice and dry on both our Antarctic and Patagonia Trips. I happened upon this idea after the first time making a wet landing and returning to the ship with wet, cold hands.  Happened to have the rubber gloves I use to do our hand laundry.   I believe I was the only one that ended up with totally dry hands when we got back on the ship. We did this trip December 2011.   As far as pants, we always carry our Frogg Togg pants.  They are a paper fabric, totally water proof and very light weight.  We use these for riding our motorcycle in the rain, so we knew they would work.  Have a great trip.

Author: svncontinents

Joined: 11/25/2011
Posts: 230
Traveler Since: 2007

January 11, 2014

 Some kind of waterproof pants are a necessisity in Antarctica.  When we went we wore regular dungarees under our nylon, outer waterproof pants and that was adequate for one of us( me ).  The other wore the nylon thermal long johns as well, and that was adequate for her( she gets colder than I ).  But you should realize that it's summer there, and it may actually be warmer in Antarctica than it is in Buffalo.  When we went( January ), the temperature was in the balmy low 40's, but it was 20 degrees colder back home in NY.  We didn't take heavy ski pants, as what we took was more than adequate.  Remember to take into consideration how much your luggage weighs. 

We concur about keeping dry, particularly your hands.  The biggest problem in Antarctica is keeping dry, not necessarily keeping warm, because it really will not be that cold when you go.  You'll get colder fast if you get wet.  We recommend visiting a tackle shop and purchasing a pair of rubber gloves that surfcasters use, with the inserts.  Those gloves have a split forefinger, which is necessary for surfcasters to cast, but even more necessary for you to take pictures.  These gloves allow you to keep them on and keep your hands warm and dry and easily manipulate your camera.  Those may be better than using kitchen gloves underneath an outer glove, as kitchen gloves will still bulk up your trigger finger, where the surfcaster gloves won't.  We were the only ones who had those gloves when we went to Antarctica, and we were the only ones whose hands stayed warm and dry.

You cannot Post or Reply, please sign in

Rules of Use:
Be Relevant

Please stick to the topic of travel when posting in our Forum. Stay on the relevant topic and do not disrupt a discussion in progress. If you have a specific customer service question or issue, please contact our Traveler Support Team by calling 1-800-221-0814.

Be Respectful

Use of any inappropriate language, personal attacks, and hate speech are not permitted. Respect others’ opinions and suggestions.

Be Mindful of Privacy Issues

Please do not post the personal information of other members (full names, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, etc).

Help us help you

Please click on the ‘Report Abuse’ button if you see an inappropriate posting.